Cask & Barrel

Hush Puppies

Apr
21

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Cornmeal, regular or stone ground, 1 cup
Flour, enriched all-purpose, 1/2 cup
Baking powder, 1 teaspoon
Salt, 1 teaspoon
Salad oil, bacon fat or melted shortening, 2 tablespoons
Egg, beaten, 1
Water, 1/2 cup
Salad oil or fat for frying, 2 tablespoons

Measure cornmeal and flour; add baking powder and salt and sift into mixing bowl. Add salad oil, bacon fat or melted shortening, egg and water.

Meanwhile heat fat for frying in skillet over moderate heat. Drop in the thick batter by spoonfuls from side of spoon to make an oblong patty. Cook to a crisp golden brown, turn; press down with spatula to flatten slightly and brown.

Drain on absorbent paper. Makes 12 hush puppies about 3 1/2 inches long.

 


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

Moselland Bernkasteler Kurfurstlay Riesling 2014

Apr
17

My favourite Riesling aromas of white peach, lime, and slate are promising. There’s a tiny bit of effervescence and minerality, but not enough acid to balance out the sweetness. The alcohol stands out in the finish considering it’s only 10% abv. Not bad for the price, but a few more dollars should get you a much more balanced wine. (3.5/5)

Moselland Bernkasteler Kurfurstlay Riesling 2014, Mosel GERMANY

$10.95/750 ml, 10.0% abv, Riesling

Corn Bread

Apr
14

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Flour, 1 cup
Baking powder, 3 1/2 teaspoons
Salt, 1 teaspoon
Sugar, 3 tablespoons
Corn meal, yellow, 1 cup
Egg, slightly beaten, 1
Milk, 1 cup
Shortening, melted, 1/4 cup

Sift flour; measure; add baking powder, salt and sugar; sift again and add corn meal; mix thoroughly.

Combine egg, milk and melted shortening (slightly cooled); pour into flour mixture and stir just enough to moisten the dry ingredients. Do not beat.

Turn into a greased square pan (8 by 8 by 2 inches) and bake in a hot oven (425 F.) about 40 minutes.

Cut into squares and serve hot.

Bacon Breakfast Bread: Add 1/2 cup crisp coarsely chopped cooked bacon to sifted flour mixture.

 


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

Rumrunners

Apr
12

South Marysburgh

Main Duck Island, twelve miles from the shore of Prince Edward, was a convenient staging point for rumrunners smuggling liquor into the United States during Prohibition. In the early years, possession of alcoholic beverages for personal use was still legal in Ontario, and although the island was occasionally raided, there was little federal agents could do to prevent stockpiling of whiskey, which was subsequently taken to the American shore at a convenient time.

However, a bizarre situation developed when the Ontario Government bowed to pressure from Temperance organizers and prohibited the sale and consumption of alcohol in the province. Manufacture of liquor for export purposes was still legal. Boatload after boatload of export whiskey left the Ontario distilleries, only to be smuggled back into the province and boot-legged to local consumers. This was far safer than slipping past American law enforcement officers, and fortunes were made in the County from the rum-running business. Many small operators sold a few cases of whiskey here and there to eke out the family income, and an unbelievable number of local residents were involved on an occasional basis. Unfortunately for the smugglers, Ontario eventually cracked down on rumrunning, and one by one the amateurs dropped out, leaving the hazardous profession in the hands of a daring few.

 


Source: Kellough, Janet. The Legendary Guide to Prince Edward County. Picton, Ont.: Kellough Productions, 1994.

County Road Beer Farmhouse Saison

Apr
10

The first beer I ever tasted from County Road Beer, and it gets better every time I go back. Perfect balance of alcohol, aromatics, bitterness, and a little bit of sour. This is the beer I want to have a full pint of after I’ve finished a tasting flight at the brew pub. (4.5/5)

County Road Beer Company County Road 3 Farmhouse Saison, CANADA 

6.6% ABV

Banana Bread

Apr
07

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Flour, 1 3/4 cups
Baking powder, 1 1/4 teaspoons
Baking soda, 1/2 teaspoon
Salt, 3/4 teaspoon
Shortening, 1/3 cup
Sugar, 2/3 cup
Eggs, slightly beaten, 2
Bananas, mashed, 1 cup (2 to 3 bananas)

Sift flour; measure; add baking powder, soda and salt; sift again.

Cream shortening; add sugar gradually; continue beating until light and fluffy. Add eggs and mix until smooth.

Add dry ingredients alternately with the mashed banana, stirring just enough to combine thoroughly. Do not beat.

Turn into a greased loaf pan (about 9 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches) and bake in a moderate oven (350 F.) about 1 hour.

 


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

Buried Treasure

Apr
05

South Marysburgh

In 1760, two French ships ran into heavy seas near Main Duck Island and foundered. One of the ships attempted to sail into the harbour at Main Ducks, but the ship broke apart on the point. There were a few survivors, who salvaged some supplies and a chest of gold from their broken vessel. The gold was buried somewhere on the island. One by one, the marooned sailors died of cold and starvation and were buried, until there was but one left. This poor sailor’s skeleton was found many years later, far from the graves of his fellow crew members, and the point where the ship foundered has been known as Graveyard Point ever since. The chest of gold still waits on Main Duck Island.

 


Source: Kellough, Janet. The Legendary Guide to Prince Edward County. Picton, Ont.: Kellough Productions, 1994.

Collective Arts Saint of Circumstance Citrus Blonde Ale

Apr
03

Plain Muffins

Mar
31

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Flour, 2 cups
Baking powder, 3 teaspoons
Salt, 3/4 teaspoon
Sugar, 2 tablespoons
Egg, slightly beaten, 1
Milk, 1 cup
Shortening, melted, 2 to 4 tablespoons

Sift flour; measure; add baking powder, salt and sugar; sift again.

Combine egg, milk and melted shortening (slightly cooled); pour into flour mixture and stir just enough to moisten the dry ingredients. Do not beat.

Fill greased muffin pans 2/3 full and bake in a hot oven (400 F.) 20 to 25 minutes. Makes 12 to 15 medium-sized muffins.

Cake Method (One-Bowl Method): For a finer-grained cakelike texture in muffins use unmelted shortening; cream the shortening, add sugar gradually; continue beating until light and fluffy. Add unbeaten egg and beat well; stir in milk. Add flour which has been sifted with baking powder and salt; proceed as directed above.

 


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

Gold Off Pt. Traverse

Mar
29

South Marysburgh

On April 29, 1853 the passenger and cargo steamer “The Ocean Wave” burned and sank three miles off Pt. Traverse with the loss of twenty-eight lives.

The Ocean Wave was a cordwood burner and the fire is believed to have started from sparks from her funnel. She had apparently been engaged in a race up the lake with another boat. The fire was so intense that it drove the second mate from the wheel and destroyed all of the lifeboats. The engine could not be stopped and was still running when she sank. The Captain was rescued by a Pt. Traverse farmer who rowed the two miles out to the burning ship. Nearby vessels saw the fire and rushed to the scene, picking survivors out of the icy waters of the lake.

It is said that all of the company’s earnings for the year were aboard The Ocean Wave. The gold and silver was being carried to Montreal for deposit when she went down, and as far as anyone knows, still lies on the bottom of the lake.

 


Source: Kellough, Janet. The Legendary Guide to Prince Edward County. Picton, Ont.: Kellough Productions, 1994.