Cask & Barrel

Gold Off Pt. Traverse

Mar
29

South Marysburgh

On April 29, 1853 the passenger and cargo steamer “The Ocean Wave” burned and sank three miles off Pt. Traverse with the loss of twenty-eight lives.

The Ocean Wave was a cordwood burner and the fire is believed to have started from sparks from her funnel. She had apparently been engaged in a race up the lake with another boat. The fire was so intense that it drove the second mate from the wheel and destroyed all of the lifeboats. The engine could not be stopped and was still running when she sank. The Captain was rescued by a Pt. Traverse farmer who rowed the two miles out to the burning ship. Nearby vessels saw the fire and rushed to the scene, picking survivors out of the icy waters of the lake.

It is said that all of the company’s earnings for the year were aboard The Ocean Wave. The gold and silver was being carried to Montreal for deposit when she went down, and as far as anyone knows, still lies on the bottom of the lake.

 


Source: Kellough, Janet. The Legendary Guide to Prince Edward County. Picton, Ont.: Kellough Productions, 1994.

Trail Estate Chardonnay Musqué 2015

Mar
27

Trail Estate Chardonnay MusquéBeautifully perfumed nose with rich tropical fruit and floral notes. The palate is surprisingly textured with some body from neutral oak aging, and flavours reminiscent of Viognier. Wines like these are a great compromise for the oaky Chard and aromatic white drinkers.  (4/5)

Trail Estate Chardonnay Musqué 2015, Ontario CANADA

$26.00/750 ml, 12.6% abv, Chardonnay Musqué

Maple Bacon Mac and Cheese

Mar
27

We were at Trail Estate Winery this past weekend for Maple in the County serving up some Maple Bacon Mac and Cheese. We sold out much faster than anticipated, so here’s the recipe to try it out yourself at home. We used a maple goat cheddar from Fifth Town Artisanal Cheese made with Fosterholm maple syrup, but any white cheddar will work. Choose a short pasta with deep ridges or grooves, so the sauce has something to cling on to. Rotini, fusilli, and cavatappi are all good. If you use penne or rigatoni, make sure they have ridges as some varieties are smooth. We used radiatore and I think it’s become my favourite shape!

Maple Bacon Mac and Cheese

Yields 10 8 oz. portions

  • 1 L whole milk
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and halved
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 clove
  • 1 pinch nutmeg
  • 1 package bacon (about 250-300 g)
  • 1 tbsp flour
  • 400 g white cheddar, grated
  • 450 g dried pasta
  • Salt to taste
  1. Bring milk to a gentle simmer over medium heat, stirring frequently and making sure the bottom doesn’t burn. Add onion, bay leaf, clove, and nutmeg. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered for 30 minutes.
  2. While the milk is simmering, dice bacon into small pieces. Cook in a large skillet over medium heat, removing the liquid fat as it renders. Save fat in a bowl or jar. Remove bacon from skillet when it starts to get crispy.
  3. Return bacon fat to the skillet and add flour. Use a whisk to incorporate the flour and fat into a roux (a paste used to thicken liquids into a sauce). Cook until the flour turns light brown, being careful not to let it burn.
  4. Strain onion, bay leaf, and clove out of the milk. Using a ladle, add a small amount of milk to the skillet with the roux. Whisk together until smooth. Continue adding milk ladle by ladle, whisking after each addition until smooth. You can start to add the milk faster and in larger portions after about half the milk has been whisked into the roux.
  5. Add grated cheese and stir until melted.
  6. Cook pasta to al dente texture (firm in the middle). Strain and return to pot. Add cooked bacon and cheese sauce to pasta and stir to combine. Season with salt and serve warm.

Crusty Rolls

Mar
24

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Water, boiling, 1 cup
Shortening, 2 tablespoons
Sugar, 1 tablespoon
Salt, 1 teaspoon
Yeast, 1 package
Enriched flour, sifted, about 4 cups
Egg whites, beaten, 2

Combine boiling water, shortening, sugar and salt; cool to warm.

Sprinkle yeast over a part of the cooled water mixture; after 5 minutes stir and combine with remaining water mixture.

Add 1 cup of the flour; beat until smooth; add beaten egg whites; beat thoroughly; add enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough.

Turn out on board and knead about 10 minutes or until smooth and satiny.

Place dough in a warm greased bowl; brush top very lightly with melted fat; cover and let rise in a warm place (80 to 85 F.) about 1 1/2 hours or until doubled in bulk.

Punch dough down thoroughly; fold in edges and turn over so that smooth side is on top; cover and let rise about 3/4 hour or until doubled in bulk.

Punch down; divide into 1 1/2 to 2 dozen portions of equal size, cover and let rest for 10 minutes.

Shape into rolls; place 2 inches apart on a greased baking sheet which has been sprinkled with white corn meal (or flour); cover and let rise about 1/2 to 3/4 hour or until doubled in bulk.

Bake in a hot oven (450 F.) for 20 to 25 minutes. For added crustiness have a large flat pan filled with boiling water on floor of oven during baking. Makes about 2 dozen rolls.

 


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

The Wreck of the Bavaria

Mar
22

South Marysburgh

The Bavaria was a three-masted timber drogher under tow by a steam barge, when it ran into mountainous seas near Point Petre. The Bavaria’s tow line parted and the ship, unable to gain any steerage way, quickly drifted off. She wasn’t found until two days later on Great Galloo Island, southwest of Main Ducks. The ship was intact, ropes in place and sails stowed. The Captain’s papers and freight money were in his desk; there was a batch of bread in the galley oven, and a pet canary was found chirping cheerfully in its cage. The disappearance of the crew of the Bavaria remains a mystery to this day.

 


Source: Kellough, Janet. The Legendary Guide to Prince Edward County. Picton, Ont.: Kellough Productions, 1994.

Bolla Valpolicella Classico 2015

Mar
20

Maple in the County

Mar
19

When: March 25 – 26, 2017
Where: Various locations

Maple in the County is the annual celebration of the maple harvest, featuring sugarbush tours, pancake breakfasts, and more at venues all over Prince Edward County. Check out mapleinthecounty.ca for a detailed list of activities and an interactive map of venues. Highlights include:

maple in the county

  • Nyam Gway at Trail Estate Winery serving Maple Bacon Mac & Cheese, paired with Chardonnay Musqué. Preorder tickets here.
  • Maple smoked salmon crostini served fireside at Norman Hardie Winery with wines by the glass.
  • A maple-themed menu prepared by Chef Neil Dowson at County Road Beer.
  • The Grange winery hosting a 5-course winemakers dinner in their Century Barn. Chef Scott Royce has created a maple-inspired menu that will be thoughtfully paired with estate wines by winemakers Caroline and Maggie Granger. More information available through Seasoned Events.

American Brioche

Mar
17

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Milk, 1 cup
Butter, or margarine, 1/2 cup
Sugar, 1/2 cup
Yeast, 2 packages
Water, warm, 1/4 cup
Enriched flour, sifted, about 5 cups
Eggs, beaten, 3
Egg yolks, beaten, 2
Salt, 1/2 teaspoon
Lemon extract, 1 teaspoon

Bring milk to a boil. Add butter and sugar; cool to lukewarm.

Sprinkle yeast over warm water. After 5 minutes, stir and combine with cooled milk mixture. Add 3 cups of the flour; beat until smooth.

Combine beaten eggs, egg yolks, salt and lemon extract; add to yeast mixture; beat 10 to 15 minutes by hand or 4 to 5 minutes with the electric mixer, using medium speed; add enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough.

Place dough in a warm greased bowl; brush surface with melted fat; cover and let rise in a warm place (80 to 85 F.) about 2 hours or until doubled in bulk. Stir down, cover and chill in refrigerator overnight.

Turn out on board. Roll 1/4 inch thick into an oblong about 18 by 24 inches. Brush with melted butter or margarine. Fold lengthwise to make 3 layers; cut into 1-inch slices. Cover and let rise until doubled in bulk.

Twist ends of each piece. Place on greased baking sheet and shape each into a coil or figure 8, 3 or S. Brush with melted fat; cover and let rise again until doubled in bulk.

Bake in a moderate oven (375 F.) for 15 to 20 minutes.

Brush while still warm with confectioners’ frosting; sprinkle with chopped nuts if desired. Makes 20 to 24 brioches.

 


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

The Schooner Picton

Mar
15

South Marysburgh

One of the strangest stories of shipwrecks in the vortex is the tale of the schooner “Picton” which, along with two others ships, the “Acadia” and the “Annie Minnes”, was carrying coal back to Canada.

The three ships were lying in harbour in Charlotte, across the lake in New York. There had been a storm the night before, but the day dawned fair.

Captain Jack Sidley of the Picton was known as a skilled and daring skipper and the Picton had the reputation of running “like a scalded cat”. Sidley had his young son, Vessey, on board with him and he was anxious to get home, so the Picton headed out of the harbour first with the Acadia about ten minutes behind her and the Annie Minnes a half an hour behind that. An hour out into the lake eye witnesses among the crew members of the Acadia and Annie Minnes reported being surprised when they saw the topsails of the Picton coming off. They thought that Sidley had decided to reef, but all of a sudden the Picton just went out of sight, “like she’d fallen into a bottomless pit.”

The two following ships dropped their sails down, looking for survivors, but all that floated by them were a few loose gratings and a sailor cap, with not a sign of the crew. The Annie Minnes and the Acadia searched for some time, but no bodies were ever found.

Months later, near Sackett’s Harbour, New York, a fisherman’s son saw a bottle bobbing in the water for three days running. Curious, he finally rowed out to pick it out of the water. Inside was a note, written in pencil that said:

“Have lashed Vessey to me with heaving line so we will be found together.” — Captain J. Sidley, The Picton

Nobody to this day has been able to explain how the Picton went down so fast, or what happened to the wreckage, or how Captain Sidley had time to write a note, or lash his son to him.

 


Source: Kellough, Janet. The Legendary Guide to Prince Edward County. Picton, Ont.: Kellough Productions, 1994.

County Road Beer Marzen

Mar
13