Cask & Barrel

Maple Bacon Mac and Cheese

Mar
27

In celebration of all things maple. This recipe uses a maple goat cheddar from Fifth Town Artisanal Cheese made with Fosterholm maple syrup, but any white cheddar can be substituted for a maple-free version.

Choose a short pasta with deep ridges or grooves, so the sauce has something to cling on to. Rotini, fusilli, and cavatappi are all good. If you use penne or rigatoni, make sure they have ridges as some varieties are smooth. I used radiatore and I think it’s become my favourite shape!

Maple Bacon Mac and Cheese

Yields 10 8 oz. portions

  • 1 L whole milk
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and halved
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 clove
  • 1 pinch nutmeg
  • 1 package bacon (about 250-300 g)
  • 1 tbsp flour
  • 400 g white cheddar, grated
  • 450 g dried pasta
  • Salt to taste
  1. Bring milk to a gentle simmer over medium heat, stirring frequently and making sure the bottom doesn’t burn. Add onion, bay leaf, clove, and nutmeg. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered for 30 minutes.
  2. While the milk is simmering, dice bacon into small pieces. Cook in a large skillet over medium heat, removing the liquid fat as it renders. Save fat in a bowl or jar. Remove bacon from skillet when it starts to get crispy.
  3. Return bacon fat to the skillet and add flour. Use a whisk to incorporate the flour and fat into a roux (a paste used to thicken liquids into a sauce). Cook until the flour turns light brown, being careful not to let it burn.
  4. Strain onion, bay leaf, and clove out of the milk. Using a ladle, add a small amount of milk to the skillet with the roux. Whisk together until smooth. Continue adding milk ladle by ladle, whisking after each addition until smooth. You can start to add the milk faster and in larger portions after about half the milk has been whisked into the roux.
  5. Add grated cheese and stir until melted.
  6. Cook pasta to al dente texture (firm in the middle). Strain and return to pot. Add cooked bacon and cheese sauce to pasta and stir to combine. Season with salt and serve warm.

Crusty Rolls

Mar
24

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Water, boiling, 1 cup
Shortening, 2 tablespoons
Sugar, 1 tablespoon
Salt, 1 teaspoon
Yeast, 1 package
Enriched flour, sifted, about 4 cups
Egg whites, beaten, 2

Combine boiling water, shortening, sugar and salt; cool to warm.

Sprinkle yeast over a part of the cooled water mixture; after 5 minutes stir and combine with remaining water mixture.

Add 1 cup of the flour; beat until smooth; add beaten egg whites; beat thoroughly; add enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough.

Turn out on board and knead about 10 minutes or until smooth and satiny.

Place dough in a warm greased bowl; brush top very lightly with melted fat; cover and let rise in a warm place (80 to 85 F.) about 1 1/2 hours or until doubled in bulk.

Punch dough down thoroughly; fold in edges and turn over so that smooth side is on top; cover and let rise about 3/4 hour or until doubled in bulk.

Punch down; divide into 1 1/2 to 2 dozen portions of equal size, cover and let rest for 10 minutes.

Shape into rolls; place 2 inches apart on a greased baking sheet which has been sprinkled with white corn meal (or flour); cover and let rise about 1/2 to 3/4 hour or until doubled in bulk.

Bake in a hot oven (450 F.) for 20 to 25 minutes. For added crustiness have a large flat pan filled with boiling water on floor of oven during baking. Makes about 2 dozen rolls.


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

American Brioche

Mar
17

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Milk, 1 cup
Butter, or margarine, 1/2 cup
Sugar, 1/2 cup
Yeast, 2 packages
Water, warm, 1/4 cup
Enriched flour, sifted, about 5 cups
Eggs, beaten, 3
Egg yolks, beaten, 2
Salt, 1/2 teaspoon
Lemon extract, 1 teaspoon

Bring milk to a boil. Add butter and sugar; cool to lukewarm.

Sprinkle yeast over warm water. After 5 minutes, stir and combine with cooled milk mixture. Add 3 cups of the flour; beat until smooth.

Combine beaten eggs, egg yolks, salt and lemon extract; add to yeast mixture; beat 10 to 15 minutes by hand or 4 to 5 minutes with the electric mixer, using medium speed; add enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough.

Place dough in a warm greased bowl; brush surface with melted fat; cover and let rise in a warm place (80 to 85 F.) about 2 hours or until doubled in bulk. Stir down, cover and chill in refrigerator overnight.

Turn out on board. Roll 1/4 inch thick into an oblong about 18 by 24 inches. Brush with melted butter or margarine. Fold lengthwise to make 3 layers; cut into 1-inch slices. Cover and let rise until doubled in bulk.

Twist ends of each piece. Place on greased baking sheet and shape each into a coil or figure 8, 3 or S. Brush with melted fat; cover and let rise again until doubled in bulk.

Bake in a moderate oven (375 F.) for 15 to 20 minutes.

Brush while still warm with confectioners’ frosting; sprinkle with chopped nuts if desired. Makes 20 to 24 brioches.


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

French Brioche

Mar
10

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Milk, 1/4 cup
Butter, or margarine, 1 cup
Sugar, 1/2 cup
Salt, 1/2 teaspoon
Grated lemon rind, 1 1/2 teaspoons
Yeast, 2 packages
Water, warm, 1/4 cup
Eggs, beaten, 6
Enriched flour, sifted, 4 1/2 cups

Bring milk to a boil. Add melted butter, sugar, salt and lemon rind; cool to lukewarm.

Sprinkle yeast over warm water. After 5 minutes, stir and combine with cooled milk mixture. Add beaten eggs.

Add 3 cups of the flour; beat for 10 minutes by hand or 4 minutes using the electric mixer set for medium speed. Then add the remaining flour and beat until mixture is smooth.

Cover and let rise in a warm place (80 to 85 F.) about 1 hour or until doubled in bulk. Stir down, cover tightly and chill overnight in the refrigerator.

Take from refrigerator, form quickly into an equal number of large and small balls, making the large balls 1/3 to 1/2 the size of muffins pans, and the small balls about 1/2 the size of large balls. Place large balls in greased muffin pans; flatten down. Top each one with a small ball. Brush with diluted slightly beaten egg white. Let rise until doubled in bulk.

Bake in hot oven (400 F.) 12 to 15 minutes. Makes about 2 1/2 dozen brioches.


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

Confectioners’ Frosting

Mar
03

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Confectioners’ sugar, sifted, 2 cups
Hot water or milk, about 2 tablespoons
Vanilla or almond flavoring, 1 teaspoon

To confectioners’ sugar add hot water or milk gradually, until the frosting has a good spreading consistency; add flavoring.

Glossy Chocolate Frosting: Add 1 square (1 ounce) melted unsweetened chocolate to the frosting, or sift 3 tablespoons cocoa with the sugar.

Lemon Confectioners’ Frosting: Substitute lemon juice for 1 tablespoon of the water; add 1/2 teaspoon grated lemon rind.


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

Baking Powder Biscuits

Feb
24

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Flour, 2 cups
Baking powder, 3 teaspoons
Salt, 1 teaspoon
Shortening, 4 tablespoons
Milk, about 3/4 cup

Sift flour; measure; add baking powder and salt; sift again.

Cut in the shortening with a pastry blender or two knives, blending it until the mixture resembles coarse corn meal.

Stirring in with fork, add enough milk to make soft dough, or until flour leaves sides of bowl and follows fork; continue stirring until all flour disappears.

Turn out on board; knead lightly for about 1/2 minute. Turn smooth side up and pat dough or roll 1/2 inch thick; cut with floured biscuit cutter.

Transfer biscuits to an ungreased baking sheet; place 1 inch apart if crusty biscuits are desired, or close together for softer biscuits with less crust.

Bake in a hot oven (425 F.) 12 to 15 minutes. Makes 14 to 16 2-inch biscuits.

Cheese Biscuits: Cut in 1 cup grated cheese with the shortening and proceed as directed. Or prepare plain biscuit dough, roll into balls 1 1/2 inches in diameter and place in small muffin pans; dot with butter and sprinkle with grated cheese; bake as directed.


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

English Muffins

Feb
17

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Milk, 1 cup
Shortening, 3 tablespoons
Salt, 1 1/2 teaspoons
Sugar, 3 tablespoons
Yeast, 1 package
Water, warm, 1/4 cup
Egg, beaten, 1
Enriched flour, sifted, 4 1/4 cups

Bring milk to a boil. Add shortening, salt, and sugar; cool to lukewarm.

Sprinkle yeast over warm water. After 5 minutes, stir and combine with cooled milk mixture; add the beaten egg and 2 cups of the flour; mix thoroughly.

Turn out on well-floured board; knead in remaining flour; continue kneading about 12 to 15 minutes or until firm and elastic.

Place dough in warm greased bowl; brush very lightly with melted fat; cover and let rise about 1 1/2 hours or until doubled in bulk.

Turn out on board; roll 1/4 inch thick; cut with large cutter into 3-inch rounds; cover and let rise on board about 1/2 to 3/4 hour or until doubled in bulk.

Bake slowly on an ungreased griddle or heavy skillet. The heat should be so regulated that the muffins will brown slowly, allowing 7 to 8 minutes for each side. If baked in muffin rings the browning will be more even, but very satisfactory muffins can be baked without use of rings. Makes about 1 dozen 4-inch muffins.


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

Deviled Eggs

Feb
10

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Eggs, hard-cooked, 6
Vinegar or pickle juice, 1 teaspoon
Dry mustard, 1/4 teaspoon
Salt, 1/2 teaspoon
Worcestershire sauce, 1/2 teaspoon
Mayonnaise, about 4 tablespoons

Carefully cut eggs into halves lengthwise and remove yolks.

Mash yolks or force through a sieve. Add vinegar, seasonings and enough mayonnaise to moisten.

Pile yolk mixture in the halves of egg white; sprinkle with paprika.


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

Hot Cross Buns

Feb
03

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Prepare 1/2 recipe rich rolls. Add 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon to dry ingredients.

When dough is light, turn out on board; lightly knead in 1/2 to 3/4 cup raisins or currants. Shape into balls about 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 inches in diameter; place in greased square pan (8 by 8 by 2 inches).

Brush with diluted egg yolk; cover and let rise about 3/4 hour, or until doubled in bulk.

Bake in a moderate oven (375 F.) about 30 minutes.

When cool, make a cross of confectioners’ frosting on each bun; sprinkle lightly with confectioners’ sugar if desired.

 


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

Rich Rolls

Jan
27

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Milk, 1 cup
Shortening (part or all butter or margarine), 1/3 cup
Sugar, 1/2 cup
Salt, 1 1/2 teaspoons
Yeast, 2 packages
Water, warm, 1/4 cup
Enriched flour, sifted, about 5 cups
Eggs, beaten, 2

Bring milk to a boil; add shortening, sugar and salt; cool to lukewarm.

Sprinkle yeast over warm water. After 5 minutes, stir and combine with cooled milk mixture; add about half the flour; add the beaten eggs; beat well. Add enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough; mix thoroughly.

Turn out on lightly floured board and knead about 10 minutes, or until smooth and satiny.

Place dough in a warm greased bowl; brush surface very lightly with melted fat; cover and let rise in a warm place (80 to 85 F.) about 2 hours or until doubled in bulk. Turn out on a board and shape into rolls as directed below.

Place on a greased baking sheet; cover and let rise 1/2 to 3/4 hour or until doubled in bulk.

Brush with milk, melted fat, diluted egg white or diluted egg yolk. Bake in a moderate oven (375 F.) 15 to 20 minutes.

Butterfly Rolls: Roll dough into a rectangle about 1/4 inch thick and 6 inches wide. Brush with melted butter or margarine and roll jelly-roll fashion. Cut in 2-inch widths. Make a depression down the center of each piece, using a small wooden handle for the purpose.

Finger Rolls: Shape into balls 1 to 1 1/2 inches in diameter; cover and let stand about 15 minutes; roll between hands until 3 or 4 inches long.

Parker House Rolls: Roll dough 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick; cut in rounds with a 2-inch biscuit or cooky cutter. Brush very lightly with melted butter or margarine. Make a crease across the center of each round, using the dull edge of a knife; fold over.

Westchester Rolls: Roll dough into an oblong about 1/4 inch thick and 9 inches wide. Brush with melted butter or margarine. Fold into thirds lengthwise so that the oblong will measure 3 inches wide. Cut crosswise in 1-inch widths.

 


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.