Cask & Barrel

Doughnuts

May
26

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Flour, 4 1/2 cups
Baking powder, 4 1/2 teaspoons
Salt, 1 teaspoon
Nutmeg, 1/4 teaspoon
Cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon
Shortening, 2 tablespoons
Sugar, 1 cup
Eggs, 2 or egg yolks, 4
Milk, 1 cup

Sift the flour; measure; add the baking powder, salt, nutmeg and cinnamon; sift again.

Cream shortening; add sugar gradually; continue beating until light and fluffy. Add eggs or egg yolks, one at a time, beating after each addition.

Add milk and flour mixture alternately, stirring until blended. Chill 1/2 hour.

Roll out on lightly floured board about 1/4 inch thick; cut with floured doughnut cutter and let stand uncovered for 20 to 30 minutes.

Drop into deep fat (365 to 375 F.) and fry 3 to 5 minutes or until golden brown, turning the doughnuts as they rise to the surface; drain on absorbent paper. Fry only a few doughnuts at a time.

Sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar if desired, or shake in a paper bag containing confectioners’ or powdered sugar. Makes about 3 1/2 dozen doughnuts.

 


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

Waffles

May
19

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Flour, 2 cups
Baking powder, 3 teaspoons
Salt, 1 teaspoon
Sugar, 2 tablespoons
Eggs, 2
Milk, 1 1/2 cups
Shortening, melted, or salad oil, 6 tablespoons

Sift flour; measure; add baking powder, salt and sugar; sift again.

Beat egg yolks; add milk and melted shortening; pour into flour mixture and stir just enough to moisten the dry ingredients. Fold in egg whites which have been beaten until stiff but not dry.

Bake 4 to 5 minutes in a moderately hot waffle baker.

Serve hot with melted butter and sirup, honey or any other desired accompaniment.

 


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

Pancakes

May
12

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Flour, 1 1/2 cups
Baking powder, 2 1/2 teaspoons
Salt, 3/4 teaspoon
Sugar, 3 tablespoons
Egg, well beaten, 1
Milk, about 1 1/4 cups
Shortening, melted, 3 tablespoons

Sift flour; measure; add baking powder, salt and sugar; sift again.

Combine egg, milk and melted shortening (slightly cooled); the amount of milk to use will depend upon thickness of pancakes desired; 3/4 cup milk will give thick cakes, 1 1/4 cups milk will make them quite thin. Pour into flour mixture and stir just enough to moisten the dry ingredients. Do not beat.

Bake on a hot griddle. Serve hot with butter and sirup, honey or sweet preserves. Makes 1 to 1 1/2 dozen cakes.

 


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

Yorkshire Pudding

May
05

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Yorkshire pudding is used as an accompaniment for roast beef. The meat should be removed from the oven before the pudding is baked since the latter requires a much higher baking temperature; or use another oven.

All-purpose flour, 1 cup
Salt, 1/2 teaspoon
Eggs, 2
Milk, 1 cup
Drippings from the roast beef, 4 tablespoons

Sift flour; measure; add salt and sift again.

Beat eggs with a rotary beater until light and thick. Add flour and 1/3 cup of the milk; continue to beat slowly until all the flour is moistened — about 30 seconds.

Gradually add remaining milk, beating until the mixture is free from lumps — 1 to 2 minutes.

Put drippings into a pan (7 1/2 by 12 by 2 inches). Pour in the batter and bake in a hot oven (425 F.) 40 to 45 minutes. Serves at once. Makes 6 to 8 servings.

Popovers: Add 1 tablespoon of melted shortening with the final addition of milk. Fill greased custard cups or iron muffin pans a little less than half full. Bake in a hot oven (425 F.) about 40 minutes. Serve at once. Makes 6 to 8 large popovers.

 


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

Norman Hardie Riesling 2015

May
01

Consistently great Riesling in the perfect off-dry style. Strikes the perfect balance of sugar, acid, alcohol, and lime flavour. The rich texture and long finish might make you think the wine is sweeter than it actually is, but there’s no cloying sugar on the tongue. (4.5/5)

Norman Hardie Riesling 2015, Ontario CANADA

$21.00/750 ml, 9.8% abv, Riesling