Cask & Barrel

Nickel Brook Head Stock India Pale Ale

Jan
30

There’s a great balance of fruity, hopped flavour and rich malt. This beer reminds me of another craft beer I had years ago when I first getting into microbrews and it definitely has a nostalgic element for me. Love it. (4.5/5)

Nickel Brook Head Stock India Pale Ale, CANADA 

7.0% ABV

Rich Rolls

Jan
27

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Milk, 1 cup
Shortening (part or all butter or margarine), 1/3 cup
Sugar, 1/2 cup
Salt, 1 1/2 teaspoons
Yeast, 2 packages
Water, warm, 1/4 cup
Enriched flour, sifted, about 5 cups
Eggs, beaten, 2

Bring milk to a boil; add shortening, sugar and salt; cool to lukewarm.

Sprinkle yeast over warm water. After 5 minutes, stir and combine with cooled milk mixture; add about half the flour; add the beaten eggs; beat well. Add enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough; mix thoroughly.

Turn out on lightly floured board and knead about 10 minutes, or until smooth and satiny.

Place dough in a warm greased bowl; brush surface very lightly with melted fat; cover and let rise in a warm place (80 to 85 F.) about 2 hours or until doubled in bulk. Turn out on a board and shape into rolls as directed below.

Place on a greased baking sheet; cover and let rise 1/2 to 3/4 hour or until doubled in bulk.

Brush with milk, melted fat, diluted egg white or diluted egg yolk. Bake in a moderate oven (375 F.) 15 to 20 minutes.

Butterfly Rolls: Roll dough into a rectangle about 1/4 inch thick and 6 inches wide. Brush with melted butter or margarine and roll jelly-roll fashion. Cut in 2-inch widths. Make a depression down the center of each piece, using a small wooden handle for the purpose.

Finger Rolls: Shape into balls 1 to 1 1/2 inches in diameter; cover and let stand about 15 minutes; roll between hands until 3 or 4 inches long.

Parker House Rolls: Roll dough 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick; cut in rounds with a 2-inch biscuit or cooky cutter. Brush very lightly with melted butter or margarine. Make a crease across the center of each round, using the dull edge of a knife; fold over.

Westchester Rolls: Roll dough into an oblong about 1/4 inch thick and 9 inches wide. Brush with melted butter or margarine. Fold into thirds lengthwise so that the oblong will measure 3 inches wide. Cut crosswise in 1-inch widths.

 


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

The Regent Theatre

Jan
25

Picton

Dominating Picton’s main street is the old Regent Theatre, which many people remember fondly from Friday night movie dates and Saturday afternoon matinees. But the Regent started life as a first-class vaudeville theatre, its stage built to the same specifications as the old Royal Alexandria Theatre in Toronto.

The Regent was built in 1922 by Greek emigrant George Cook, who had come to the area via the United States. For a number of years, it was a popular booking for touring reperatory companies, opera companies and local amateur theatrical groups. Many tourist would come to the County for the shows and stay for the weekend in the then elegant Royal Hotel.

Cook had also had considerable experience presenting and promoting moving pictures, and the Regent was equipped to show the latest reels. Prior to the building of the Regent, Cook was involved with the Bijou Opera House (the Town Hall), which stood where Picton Town Hall is still located. The Bijou had long been a popular venue for local productions and Cook utilized the hall for many movie presentations. Unfortunately, the hall was gutted by fire in 1923.

The Regent became an institution in the town. Many families from outlying areas would come into Picton on a Saturday night, take in the show at the Regent, then purchase groceries and do their shopping after the movie. (In those days, Picton stores stayed open until midnight.) Sadly, as operating costs became prohibitive in recent years, the theatre was seldom used and was in danger of falling into disuse completely, until a local group decided to try and purchase the building. The Regent Theatre Foundation eventually succeeded in raising a down payment for the building in the spring of 1994, but were faced with the costs of a substantial mortgage when an anonymous donor presented the Foundation with a donation of $300,000, on the proviso that the mortgage be retired.

Restoration of the Regent Theatre continues and the foundation hopes to re-establish its reputation as “the finest stage between Toronto and Montreal”.

 


Source: Kellough, Janet. The Legendary Guide to Prince Edward County. Picton, Ont.: Kellough Productions, 1994.

Collective Arts Rhyme & Reason Extra Pale Ale

Jan
23

No-Knead White Bread

Jan
20

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Milk, 1 1/2 cups
Shortening, 1/2 cup
Sugar, 1/4 cup
Salt, 1 tablespoon
Yeast, 3 packages
Water, warm, 1 1/2 cups
Eggs, 3
Enriched flour, sifted, 6 cups

Bring the milk to a boil. Add shortening, sugar, and salt. Reduce temperature to lukewarm.

Sprinkle yeast over the warm water and let stand 5 to 8 minutes. Stir, and add the milk mixture.

Add the eggs and mix well.

Add the sifted flour and mix until the dough is well blended. The dough will be softer than a kneaded dough.

Shape dough into 2 loaves on a well-floured board. Place in greased 9x4x3-inch pans, and cover.

Let rise in a warm place (80 to 85 F.) until double in bulk. (About an hour.)

Bake in a hot oven (400 F.) for 1 hour.

 


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

Weddings

Jan
18

Ameliasburg

Getting married in the early days of settlement was a great and sometimes difficult undertaking. At first, the performance of a marriage ceremony could only be undertaken by a clergyman of the Church of England or a Justice of the Peace. Most marriages in Ameliasburg were performed by a Mr. Young at Carrying Place. The wedding party would put chairs in a lumber wagon to carry the young people to the ceremony. Normally old people did not attend the actual wedding. The men would sit on the chairs, while the women sat on their laps (supposedly to make room for everyone). Drinking was allowed, but fighting was frowned upon. If a fight broke out, the miscreants were put out of the wagon.

A wedding without a dance afterwards was considered an insipid affair and the old people joined the young in a party that would often go on for two or even three nights! A favourite wedding trick was to take the groom’s wagon apart and reassemble it without the bolts, so that it would fall apart as soon as the couple started off on their wedding journey. Sometimes the wagon would be taken apart and reassembled on the roof.

Another common practice when a marriage was unpopular, was the chivaree. Normally reserved for second marriages, or when there was a great disparity in the ages of the bride and groom, the chivaree was a raucous affair, with a great deal of noise and carousing. Neighbours would gather under the window of the newly-married couple equipped with tin pans, drums, whistles, copper kettles or anything that would make noise. They would then “serenade” the honeymooners. The bridegroom was faced with a choice: furnish or pay for drinks for the entire mob, or listen to them all night. In most cases, the groom would send them off to the local tavern. If the marriage was particularly objectionable, the pranksters might climb up on the roof and stop up the chimney, hoping to smoke the wedding party out, but most of the time the chivaree was a good-natured, if rowdy, affair. This custom of chivaree is still practiced occasionally in the County, but it is becoming more and more uncommon.

 


Source: Kellough, Janet. The Legendary Guide to Prince Edward County. Picton, Ont.: Kellough Productions, 1994.

Featherstone Black Sheep Riesling 2015

Jan
16

featherstone-black-sheep-riesling-2015Delicious, ripe stone fruit and sweet lemon-lime jump out of the glass. There’s great body and rich fruit flavour, paired with excellent balance make this a prime example of Ontario Riesling. (4.5/5)

Featherstone Black Sheep Riesling 2015, Ontario CANADA

$16.95/750 ml, 9.8% ABV, Riesling

 

Standard Rolls

Jan
13

This recipe is transcribed from one of my Grandmother’s old cook books, given to her by her mother. I’ve written it down here as a way to preserve it, and also because I strongly believe that some dishes are best in their simplest form. When learning to cook anything new, I like to begin with the traditional method before experimenting with my own take on things. All ingredients and instructions are as written in the original text.


Milk, 2 cups
Shortening (part of all butter or margarine), 1/4 cup
Sugar, 1/4 cup
Salt, 2 teaspoons
Yeast, 2 packages
Water, warm, 1/4 cup
Enriched flour, sifted, 5 to 6 cups

Bring milk to a boil, add shortening, sugar and salt; cool to lukewarm.

Sprinkle yeast over warm water. After 5 minutes, stir and combine with cooled milk mixture; add about half the flour; beat well. Add enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough; mix thoroughly.

Turn out on lightly floured board, cover with mixing bowl and let rest 10 minutes, until smooth and satiny.

Place dough in a warm greased bowl; brush surface very lightly with melted fat; cover and let rise in a warm place (80 to 85 F.) about 2 hours or until doubled in bulk. Do not punch down. Turn out on board and shape into rolls as directed below.

Place on a greased baking sheet; cover and let rise 1/2 to 3/4 hour or until doubled in bulk.

Brush with  milk, melted fat, diluted egg white or diluted egg yolk. Bake in a moderate oven (375 F) 15 to 20 minutes.

Biscuit Rolls: Roll 1/2 inch thick; cut into 2-inch rounds with a biscuit cutter.

Bowknots: Roll pieces of dough into ropes about 1/2 inch in diameter and 6 to 8 inches long; tie each length loosely into a knot.

Cloverleaf Rolls: Shape dough into tiny balls; dip in melted fat and place 3 balls in each section of a greased muffin pan.

Crescents: Roll 1/4 of the dough into a circle about 9 inches in diameter and 1/4 inch thick, marking with a cake or pie pan to obtain an exact circle. Cut into 10 or 12 wedge-shaped pieces and roll each jelly-roll fashion, beginning at the round edge. Place on greased baking sheet with point of dough on the bottom. Curve each roll into crescent shape on the baking sheet.

Hot-Dog and Hamburger Rolls: Roll dough 1/2 inch thick; cut with a large biscuit cutter. For frankfurter rolls, let stand, covered, about 15 minutes, then gently stretch rounds into oval shape.

Poppy-Seed Braids: Roll pieces of dough into slender ropes about 1/4 inch in diameter and 12 to 14 inches long. Braid 3 ropes together; cut off into desired lengths and press ends together firmly. Sprinkle with poppy seeds.

Rose Rolls: Follow directions for bowknots. After tying, bring one end up and through center of knot and other end over the side and under.

 


Kirk, Dorothy, ed. Woman’s Home Companion Cook Book. New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1953. Print.

Sodom and Gommorah

Jan
11

Sophiasburgh

Demorestville, named for Guillaume Demorest who started the first mill, was a wild and woolly village in the early 1800’s. Lumbermen from the surrounding area made it the centre of their Saturday night drinking binges and free-for-alls. Demorest’s first wife was on her death-bed when a dance was given by one of her neighbours. The party was so boisterous and the noise bothered Mrs. Demorest so much that she remarked that they were “as bad as the inhabitants of Sodom”. The name stuck. For many years the village was known as “Sodom” and just down the hill towards Big Island is a small side-road still marked as “Gommorah Road.”

 


Source: Kellough, Janet. The Legendary Guide to Prince Edward County. Picton, Ont.: Kellough Productions, 1994.

Trail Estate Hughes Vineyard Riesling 2015

Jan
09

trail-estate-rieslingThis wild-ferment Riesling has a pretty, perfumed nose of lemon and sweet orange. It’s off-dry, but has plenty of minerality and tart acid to balance it out. The restrained palate of candied lime makes it a great apertif, with a clean finish leaving you thirsty for more. (4/5)

Trail Estate Hughes Vineyard Riesling 2015, Ontario CANADA

$28.00/750 ml, 10.0% ABV, Riesling